15 Beautiful Flowering Succulents & How to Keep Them

Within the past few years succulents have skyrocketed in popularity, becoming one of the trendiest plants to purchase. Whether they’re enhancing a garden scene, decorating a windowsill, or bringing a pop of color to a work desk, succulents seem to be everywhere you look, and for good reason!

While most succulents come from dry, arid areas, they adapt easily to grow in a variety of environments, and even gardeners not blessed with a green thumb find them relatively easy to care for. But it’s not just the low-maintenance that draws plant-lovers to succulents. People are taken with the wide range of colors, shapes, and textures that succulents provide.

It’s no surprise, then, that flowering succulents are especially sought-after, as the spectacular blooms only enhance these already unique and vibrant plants.


Our Favorite Flowering Succulents

Below you’ll find some of the most eye-catching flowering succulents.

Perle von Nürnberg Echeveria (Echeveria ‘Perle von Nürnberg’)

Echeveria ‘Perle von Nürnberg’

Echeverias are some of the most popular succulents and a particularly elegant echeveria hybrid is the Perle von Nürnberg. This beloved beauty produces rosettes with an ombre effect, commonly ranging from greyish lavender to pastel pinks and purples. The Perle von Nürnberg can grow up to eight inches in diameter and will produce gorgeous coral-pink, bell-shaped flowers on an elegant one-foot plant stalk.

  • Lighting requirements: PVN’s can tolerate anything from indirect light to full sun. If grown indoors, they should be placed next to a sunny, south-facing window.
  • Watering requirements: Water PVN’s only once the soil dries, about once a week. Drench but do not leave the soil soggy. Avoid getting rosettes wet, drying any that do get wet.
  • Soil requirements: The soil mix should be any well-draining, porous succulent mix.
  • Repotting: Repot as needed when your plant outgrows its pot, preferably in spring or summer.
  • Winter Hardy in Zones: 9a-11b. Keep the PVN as an annual or overwinter indoors in climates outside zones 9a-11b.
  • Propagation: PVN’s propagate best from leaf and stem cuttings and from any offsets that appear.
  • Susceptibilities: PVN’s are susceptible to scale, spider mites, mealybugs, and root rot.

Peacock Echeveria (Echeveria peacockii)

The Echeveria peacockii produces eye-catching bright pink-orange flowers, sometimes from multiple bloom stalks stemming from a single powdery blue-grey rosette. The rosettes can grow up to six inches in diameter while the flowers can shoot up to be ten inches tall. This plant is not as common as its cousin above, however, so you might have to do some sleuthing before you can take one home.

  • Lighting requirements: Echeveria peacockii prefers full sun and can be grown outdoors or potted indoors next to a sunny, south-facing window.
  • Watering requirements: Water your plant only once the soil dries. Drench but do not leave the soil soggy. Avoid getting rosettes wet, drying any that do.
  • Soil requirements: The soil mix should be any well-draining, porous succulent mix.
  • Repotting: Repot as needed when it outgrows its pot, preferably in spring or summer.
  • Winter Hardy in Zones: 9b-11b. Keep as an annual or overwinter your plant indoors in climates outside zones 9b-11b.
  • Propagation: Echeveria peacockii propagates best from stem or leaf cuttings and from any offsets that appear.
  • Susceptibilities: Echeveria peacockii is susceptible to mealybugs, vine weevil, and aphids.

‘Compton Carousel’ (Echeveria ‘Compton Carousel’)

Echeveria ‘Compton Carousel’

In the fashion world stripes are always in, and it seems the same rule applies to the plant world—this is one in demand plant! Echeveria Compton carousel’s cream and blue-gray-striped leaves belong in any modern plant-lover’s collection. This sun-loving succulent produces many tight rosettes close together. Its beautiful orange flowers grow on an elegantly arched stalk up to one foot in length during the summer months.

  • Lighting requirements: Your plant will do well in full to partial sun. It does well outdoors in warm climates but may also be potted inside and placed in a sunny window.
  • Water requirements: Water your Compton carousel only once the soil dries. Drench but do not leave the soil soggy. Avoid getting rosettes wet, drying any that do get wet.
  • Soil requirements: The soil mix should be any well-draining, porous succulent mix.
  • Repotting: Repot as needed when your plant outgrows its pot, preferably in spring or summer.
  • Winter Hardy in Zones: 9a-11b. Keep your plant as an annual or overwinter it indoors in climates outside zones 9a-11b.
  • Propagation: This plant propagates best from leaf cuttings and any offsets that appear.
  • Susceptibilities: This plant is susceptible to mealybugs, vine weevil, aphids, and root rot.

Jelly Bean Plant (Sedum rubrotinctum)

Sedum rubrotinctum

Sedum rubrotinctum, also known as both jelly bean plant and pork and beans plant, is a delightful succulent perennial that can produce plump, bean-shaped green leaves that turn yellow and red when exposed to sun and heat. This jolly plant produces yellow star-shaped flowers in spring and does just as well as a ground cover as in a container. As an added bonus, this plant often propagates itself: its fallen leaves root while still connected to the original plant, making it cute and convenient!

  • Lighting requirements: Sedum rubrotinctum prefers full sun to partial shade. This succulent is often grown outdoors where it can be used as groundcover because it likes to spread, but it can be planted indoors in a container as well.
  • Water requirements: Water only once the soil dries. Drench but do not leave soil soggy. Avoid getting rosettes wet, drying any that do get wet.
  • Soil requirements: The soil mix should be any well-draining, porous succulent mix.
  • Repotting: Repot in the spring once it outgrows its container or every other year.
  • Winter Hardy in Zones: 9a-11b. Keep as an annual or overwinter indoors in climates outside zones 9a-11b.
  • Propagation: This plant propagates best from stem cuttings but will often propagate itself.
  • Susceptibilities: Sedum rubrotinctum is susceptible to root rot but is pest resistant.

Zebra Plant (Hawthoria attenuata)

Zebra Cactus

This striking, stemless perennial succulent is dark green with horizontal white bands which give it its distinctive, zebra-like appearance. Hawthoria attenuata is an easy to care for plant and is particularly suited to growing indoors. It produces long, sixteen-inch flower stalks and delicate white, green-veined flowers with curled petals.

One of the coolest aspects of the zebra plant is that while it blooms in summer, it can be ever-blooming if you simply snip off each bloom when it dies!

  • Lighting requirements: Hawthoria attenuata needs indirect sunlight. (This is one of the few succulents that doesn’t tolerate direct sunlight.) It grows well potted indoors near east- or west-facing windows.
  • Water requirements: Water only once the soil dries. Drench but do not leave soil soggy. Avoid getting rosettes wet, drying any that do.
  • Soil requirements: The soil mix should be any well-draining, porous succulent mix.
  • Repotting: Repot your plant in spring or early summer about every other year. Note that this plant may need a deep pot because it has an extensive root system.
  • Winter Hardy in Zones: 9a-11b. Keep as an annual or overwinter indoors in climates outside 9a-11b.
  • Propagation: Hawthoria attenuata propagates best by offsets from the mother plant. Simply cut the offshoots or pups as close to the mother plant as possible, let dry for a couple of days to callous, then replant.
  • Susceptibilities: This succulent is susceptible to mealybugs, spider mites, and scale.

Christmas Cactus (Schlumbergera bridgessii)

Schlumbergera bridgessii

The Christmas cactus is a segmented, scalloped succulent with long, drooping stems. It gets its name from the beautiful trumpet-shaped flowers it produces in mid-winter. The flowers may be white, pink, red, or yellow, but whatever the flower color your Christmas cactus produces, it is sure to bring plenty of beauty and joy during the winter holidays.

  • Lighting requirements: This succulent prefers partial shade.
  • Water requirements: Water only once the soil dries. Drench but do not leave soil soggy. Note that this plant is happiest in an environment with 50-60% humidity.
  • Soil requirements: The soil mix should be any well-draining, porous succulent mix.
  • Repotting: Repot only every two or three years.
  • Winter Hardy in Zones: 10a-11a. This succulent is normally kept potted indoors.
  • Propagation: The Christmas cactus propagates best from leaf cuttings. Pinch off a stem with three segments, let dry for a few hours, then place in a pot with the same soil as the mother plant.
  • Susceptibilities: Your Christmas cactus may be susceptible to root rot and cactus cysts.

Florist Kalanchoe (Kalanchoe Blossfeldiana)

Kalanchoe Blossfeldiana

This easy-to-grow blooming beauty does best as a houseplant and, much like the Christmas cactus, it is a favorite among florists and holiday gift-givers. It blooms naturally in spring but can be trained to bloom on cue by altering the light and water it receives. Florist kalanchoe blossoms appear in cheerful clusters and come in a variety of colors, including orange, pink, red, yellow, and white.

  • Lighting requirements: All kalanchchoe plants need lots of light. It’s best to keep yours in a south-facing window in winter and an east- or west-facing window during summer.
  • Water requirements: Water only once the soil dries. Drench but do not leave soil soggy. Avoid getting the plant wet.
  • Soil requirements: The soil mix should be any well-draining, porous succulent mix.
  • Repotting: Repot in the fall after blooming or once your kalanchoe outgrows its container.
  • Winter Hardy in Zones: 10a-11b. While you can grow kalanchoe outdoors in partial shade, it’s best to keep these as potted plants indoors away from drafts.
  • Propagation: This succulent propagates best from stem or leaf cuttings.
  • Susceptibilities: Florist kalanchoe is susceptible to mealybugs, scale, and aphids.

Living Stone (Lithops)

Lithops bloom

This curious little succulent hails from South Africa and, as the name suggests, looks remarkably like a small stone. It has evolved to blend in with its surroundings and, in the wild, can be hard to spot. Much like real stones, the living stone plant can range in color from greys and browns to greens and even pinks. It commonly flowers in fall or early winter and produces yellow or white, daisy-like blooms.

  • Lighting requirements: The living stone plant does best in full sunlight for four to five hours a day and can be grown in pots indoors or outdoors.
  • Water requirements: Water only once the soil dries, about every two weeks. Drench but do not leave soil soggy. Greatly reduce watering in summer when the living stone goes dormant but mist the plant once a week.
  • Soil requirements: The soil mix should be any well-draining, porous succulent or cactus mix.
  • Repotting: Repot when the plant has outgrown its pot, which will occur only after several years.
  • Winter Hardy in Zones: 10 and over. Keep as an annual or overwinter indoors in climates outside zones 10 and higher. Note that this little African plant does not like the cold!
  • Propagation: Lithops propagates best from dividing a multi-headed plant. Replant immediately after dividing.
  • Susceptibilities: Lithops is susceptible to spider mites, mealybugs, scale, and aphids.

String of Pearls (Senecio rowleyanus)

Senecio rowleyanus

One of the most coveted succulents today is the string of pearls. This trailing plant has round, pearl-shaped green leaves that can grow up to three feet in length and looks particularly lovely in a macramé hanger. String of pearls’ fuzzy white flowers appear in winter or spring and are said to smell like cinnamon!

  • Lighting requirements: String of pearls only needs four to five hours of direct sunlight a day.
  • Water requirements: Water regularly, keeping the soil slightly moist during the growing season in spring and summer. Reduce watering in winter.
  • Soil requirements: The soil mix should be any sandy, well-draining, succulent mix.
  • Repotting: Repot in the beginning of spring every year.
  • Winter Hardy in Zones: 9a-12b. Note that this succulent is primarily kept indoors as a hanging plant.
  • Propagation: String of pearls propagates best by rooting cuttings in water or soil.
  • Susceptibilities: This succulent is susceptible to root rot if overwatered.

Bear Paw (Cotyledon tomentosa)

Cotyledon tomentosa
Abu Shawka / CC BY-SA

The adorable bear paw succulent looks like a bear hug feels. It is named for its plump and fuzzy paw-like leaves that have reddish brown “teeth” at the tips resembling a bear’s claws. As if the paw-like leaves weren’t reason enough to own this plant, it can produce yellow or orange, bell-shaped flowers, too!

  • Lighting requirements: Bear paw prefers full sun to partial shade, ideally with six hours’ full sun outdoors or in a south-facing window indoors.
  • Water requirements: Water only once the soil dries. Drench but do not leave soil soggy. Avoid getting leaves wet, drying any that do. Reduce watering in winter.
  • Soil requirements: The soil mix should be any well-draining, sandy succulent mix.
  • Repotting: Repot when needed, making sure the pot is only slightly larger than its root system.
  • Winter Hardy in Zones: 10a-10b. Bear paw thrives as a potted plant indoors.
  • Propagation: It is propagated best from cuttings and seeds.
  • Susceptibilities: Bear paw is susceptible to mealybugs and scale.

Bunny succulent (Monilaria obconica)

Perhaps the most adorable plant on the list, in its early stages monilaria obconica resembles cute little bunny ears popping up out of the pot. The plant even looks fuzzy like a sweet little bunny because it is covered in small, crystalline cells. As it grows, the “ears” become long, green (or red in full sun) spaghetti-like leaves that will spread and produce white daisy-like flowers in spring.

  • Lighting requirements: Monilaria obconica does not like direct sunlight but prefers partial shade and bright, indirect light.
  • Water requirements: Regularly water in winter months. Then, water only once the soil dries. Drench but do not leave soil soggy.
  • Soil requirements: The soil mix should be any well-draining, loam-based succulent mix.
  • Repotting: Repot in spring once it outgrows its container or every other year.
  • Winter Hardy in Zones: 10a-11b.
  • Propagation: This is best propagated from cuttings or seed. If propagating with cuttings, make sure your cutting as one or more branches and a bit of root attached.
  • Susceptibilities: This charming plant may be susceptible to mealybugs, vine weevil, and aphids.

Cobweb Hen and Chick (Sempervivium arachnoideum)

Cobweb hen and chick forms tight rosettes that appear to have white cobwebs draped gracefully around the surface of the plant. It produces starry pink flowers from a tall flower stalk in the middle of the rosette, but because it is monocarpic, it will die after blooming. Don’t worry, though— the plant (hen) will only bloom once it has already produced plenty of offshoots (chicks) and you can easily propagate this plant and be blessed with many cobweb hens and chicks for years to come.

  • Lighting requirements: This plant does best outdoors where it can receive plenty of light but will do fine if potted inside and placed in a very bright window. Note that when outside in full sun, the plant will turn purplish brown.
  • Water requirements: Water only once the soil dries. Drench but do not leave soil soggy. Avoid getting rosettes wet, drying any that do. Limit watering in winter.
  • Soil requirements: The soil mix should be any well-draining, porous succulent mix.
  • Repotting: Repot yearly in the spring or once it outgrows its container.
  • Winter Hardy in Zones: 5a-8b. Keep as an annual or overwinter indoors in climates outside zones 5a-8b.
  • Propagation: It is best propagated from leaf cuttings and any pups or offsets that appear.
  • Susceptibilities: to vine weevil, rust, and root rot.

Rock Purslane (Calandrinia grandiflora)

This whimsical plant is a type of Calandrinia that does best as groundcover. It produces bright, poppy-like magenta flowers from its grey-green leaves anywhere between mid-summer and late fall and can grow up to 1.5 feet tall. It propagates easily and is a perfect plant to share with a friend.

  • Lighting requirements: This plant prefers full sunlight in a garden where it can spread.
  • Water requirements: Water only once the soil dries. Drench but do not leave soil soggy.
  • Soil requirements: The soil mix should be any well-draining, sandy or loamy succulent mix.
  • Repotting: Calandrinia plants are ideal as groundcover or as edging and are not typically potted.
  • Winter Hardy in Zones: 8a-10b as a perennial.
  • Propagation: Rock purslane propagates easily from stem cuttings.
  • Susceptibilities: This plant is largely pest and disease resistant!

Spiral Aloe (Aloe polyphilla)

Math-lovers rejoice! This perfect fractal is a sight to behold with its spiraling rows of tight, pointed green leaves. The geometrical delight typically has five rows of leaves and can grow up to one foot tall and two feet wide. While it is rare for spiral aloe to flower, when it does, it produces salmon-colored tubular blooms in spring or summer.

  • Lighting requirements: Aloe polyphylla prefers full sun to partial shade and does best outdoors in a garden or decorative container.
  • Water requirements: Water regularly, never letting the plant go dry. Do not leave soil soggy. Limit watering when dormant.
  • Soil requirements: The soil mix should be any well-draining, sandy succulent mix.
  • Repotting: Repot your plant once it outgrows its container, is rootbound, or starts to develop pups.
  • Winter Hardy in zones: 7a-9b. Keep as an annual or overwinter indoors in climates outside zones 7a-9b.
  • Propagation: Aloe polyphylla propagates best from stem cuttings and any offsets that appear.
  • Susceptibilities: This succulent is susceptible to mealybugs and scale but is largely pest-free.

Fox Tail Agave (Agave attenuata)

Agave attenuata is a large succulent also known as fox tail agave, which refers to its striking fluffy flower stalk that appears in the summertime, growing up to ten feet tall! The tail-like flower stalk arcs and is thick and sturdy, covered in tiny white and yellow-green flowers. It’s important to note that the fox tail agave doesn’t flower often, perhaps only flowering once during its lifetime.

  • Lighting requirements: ‘Fox tails’ prefer full sun to partial shade.
  • Water requirements: Water only once the soil dries. This plant has low water needs and is drought resistant.
  • Soil requirements: The soil should be a slightly acidic, well-draining, porous succulent mix.
  • Repotting: This plant can grow up to five feet tall (not including its raceme) and four feet wide, so it is not often potted. If you do keep it in a container, repot about every two years.
  • Winter Hardy in Zones: 9a-12b. Keep as an annual or overwinter indoors in climates outside zones 9a-12b.
  • Propagation: This plant propagates most easily from any offsets that appear or from seed pods on flowering stalk.
  • Susceptibilities: Agave attenuata is largely pest resistant, but it may be susceptible to snails and slugs and root rot if overwatered.