14 Full Sun Succulents That You’ll Love

It’s summertime in the northern hemisphere, and sun-worshipers are putting on their sunglasses and flocking to beaches to soak up some rays. While you won’t catch any of the succulents listed below donning Ray-bans at an outdoor barbeque, these plants crave full sunlight and do best in consistently sunny locations.

Tip: collect some of the succulents below and sun yourselves together!

Our Favorite Full Sun Succulents

Here are 14 of our favorite full sun succulents:

‘Sticks on Fire’ (Euphorbia tirucalli v. rosea ‘Sticks on Fire’)

Euphorbia tirucalli sticks on fire
Photo by and (c)2006 Derek Ramsey (Ram-Man). Location credit to the Chanticleer Garden. / CC BY-SA

With a name like ‘Sticks on Fire’, it’s no surprise that this distinctive succulent shrub loves full sun. This plant is a favorite in-ground outdoor evergreen that produces pencil-thin stems that resemble flaming sticks, especially in winter when its color is reddest. It can grow up to eight feet tall and wide and provides a fiery pop of color and lovely vertical accent to any waterwise garden.

  • Lighting requirements: Full sun.
  • Watering requirements: ‘Sticks on Fire’ is drought tolerant and thus has low water needs. Water only when the topsoil is completely dry.
  • Soil requirements: The soil should be any well-draining, sandy succulent mix.
  • Repotting: Sticks on fire is often planted in-ground. If planted in a container, repot as needed when your plant outgrows its pot, perhaps every three years.
  • Winter Hardy in Zones: 10a-12b.
  • Propagation: ‘Sticks on Fire’ is easily propagated from stem cuttings.
  • Susceptibilities: This plant is largely pest and disease resistant and quite easy to care for. Note: while ‘Sticks on Fire’ is not susceptible to damage, it is toxic to humans—do not get its sap near your face or eyes and use gloves when handling!

Paddle Plant (Kalanchoe luciae)

Kalanchoe luciae
Mokkie / CC BY-SA

With its flat, rounded jade-green leaves with red borders, Kalanchoe luciae is certainly one of the most eye-catching succulents. When its paddle-like leaves are exposed to proper sunlight, their jade-green color will recede and become more and more red. Your Kalanchoe luciae can grow up to 24 inches tall and 36 inches wide, making it suitable for inground and potted planting alike.

  • Lighting requirements: Full sun, preferably outdoors. If grown indoors, make sure your paddle plant gets at least six hours of morning sunlight a day.
  • Watering requirements: Water only when the topsoil is completely dry. Reduce watering in winter, when the soil will remain moist longer.
  • Soil requirements: The soil should be any well-draining, loamy or sandy succulent mix.
  • Repotting: Pot your Kalanchoe luciae in a clay pot. Repot as needed when your plant outgrows its pot in spring, normally every one to two years.
  • Winter Hardy in Zones: 9a-12b.
  • Propagation: Propagate your plant with leaf or stem cuttings and by any offsets that may appear.
  • Susceptibilities: Kalanchoe luciae may be susceptible to mealybugs and to slugs and snails, which can permanently damage its leaves.

Golden Barrel Cactus (Echinocactus grusonii)

Echinocactus grusonii
AlixSaz / CC BY-SA

This delightfully chubby cactus won’t fail to bring a smile to your face. Golden Barrel Cactus is green and ribbed with light yellow spines. This rotund succulent can grow up to four feet tall and three feet wide and makes for a charming feature in any waterwise garden. Just be careful if you have small children or pets nearby—while its spines are charming aesthetically, they can really hurt!

  • Lighting requirements: Full sun, preferably outdoors. Just make sure your cactus isn’t exposed to southwestern sun and heat during the hottest days of the year.
  • Watering requirements: Water only when the topsoil is completely dry. Reduce watering in winter when soil will remain moist longer.
  • Soil requirements: The soil should be any well-draining, succulent mix or soil.
  • Repotting: You won’t need to repot this cactus often. Repot in an unglazed pot when your plant outgrows its container. Just make sure to wear thick garden gloves when you do!
  • Winter Hardy in Zones: 9a-11b.
  • Propagation: Golden Barrel Cactus is typically propagated by seed or by removing pups that may appear.
  • Susceptibilities: This succulent is largely pest resistant but may be susceptible to mealybugs, water rot, and cactus funguses.

Century Plant (Agave americana)

Agave americana
Linkin (Alexander Goesten) / CC BY-SA

The sun loving Century Plant is not only beautiful but helpful, too! It has antiseptic and anti-inflammatory properties, and you can even roast and eat the flower stalks and base leaves. Agave americana’s rosette leaves are pointed and lined with sharp spines. This large, grey-green beauty can grow up to six feet tall and ten feet wide.

  • Lighting requirements: Full sun to partial shade, preferably outdoors.
  • Watering requirements: Water only when the topsoil is completely dry. Reduce watering in winter when soil will remain moist longer. If kept in a container, more frequent watering is necessary.
  • Soil requirements: The soil should be any well-draining, succulent mix or rocky or sandy soil.
  • Repotting: Repot in a slightly larger pot once you notice your Agave americana has become rootbound.
  • Winter Hardy in Zones: 8a-11b.
  • Propagation: Your Century Plant is best propagated by any offsets that may appear.
  • Susceptibilities: This succulent is susceptible to agave snout weevil.

Silver Dollar Jade (Crassula arborescens)

Crassula arborescens
JJ Harrison (https://www.jjharrison.com.au/) / CC BY-SA

With silvery green leaves lined in dark pink, Crassula arborescens makes for a lovely addition to any home garden and even does well indoors if it receives enough sunlight. While it can reach four feet in height, it can easily be kept to a smaller, more manageable size by regular pruning and planting it in a smaller pot. Between spring and summer, Silver Dollar Jade produces clusters of starry white blooms.

  • Lighting requirements: Full sun to light shade.
  • Watering requirements: Water only when the topsoil is completely dry. Mature plants that are grown outdoors rarely need watering at all.
  • Soil requirements: The soil should be any well-draining succulent or cactus mix.
  • Repotting: Repot as needed, preferably in spring or early summer.
  • Winter Hardy in Zones: 9b-11a.
  • Propagation: Your Silver Dollar Jade plant is best propagated in summer by stem or leaf cuttings.
  • Susceptibilities: This succulent is susceptible to mealybugs, fungal diseases, and root rot.

Pink Ice Plant (Oscularia deltoides)

pink ice plant
C T Johansson / CC BY

This flowering shrublet has small, plump, triangular blue-green leaves with harmless little “teeth”. In spring Pink Ice Plant’s unique leaves are covered in masses of magenta, daisy-like blooms. This plant likes to spread, growing up to one foot tall and three feet wide, and when planted in containers it will cascade out of them, providing beauty whether flowering or not.

  • Lighting requirements: Full sun.
  • Watering requirements: Water only when the topsoil is completely dry. Reduce watering in winter months.
  • Soil requirements: The soil should be any well-draining succulent or cactus mix.
  • Repotting: Repot in early spring once a year if grown indoors.
  • Winter Hardy in Zones: 8a-11b.
  • Propagation: Oscularia deltoides is best propagated by stem cuttings.
  • Susceptibilities: This succulent is susceptible to mealybugs, aphids, and root rot.

Lipstick Echeveria (Echeveria agavoides ‘Lipstick’)

Echeveria agavoides ‘Lipstick’

With its lime green leaves and bright crimson edges, Lipstick Echeveria is certainly a looker. When exposed to enough sunlight, this plant’s “lipstick” becomes even more stunningly pronounced. Lipstick Echeveria grows up to six inches tall and a foot wide, making it perfect for outdoor gardens and decorative containers alike.

  • Lighting requirements: Full to partial sun.
  • Watering requirements: Water only when the topsoil is completely dry. Reduce watering in winter months.
  • Soil requirements: The soil should be any well-draining succulent mix or a loamy or sandy soil.
  • Repotting: Repot in spring or early summer as needed.
  • Winter Hardy in Zones: 9a-12b.
  • Propagation: Lipstick Echeveria is best propagated in spring by removing offsets about every two to three years.
  • Susceptibilities: This succulent is virtually disease free but may be susceptible to mealybugs, aphids, and vine weevil.

Key Lime Pie (Adromischus cristasis)

Adromischus cristasis
Manuelarosi / CC BY-SA

With its dreamy deep green, crinkled, puffy leaves, Adromischus cristasus is a welcome addition to any plant-lover’s home. This easy-going, slow-growing succulent will only reach about six inches tall, making it a perfect plant for potting. It prefers to live outdoors where it can receive plenty of direct sunlight.

  • Lighting requirements: Full sun.
  • Watering requirements: Water only when the topsoil is completely dry. Reduce watering in winter months. This plant does not like overwatering!
  • Soil requirements: The soil should be any well-draining, porous succulent mix.
  • Repotting: Repot only when necessary, which is not often. Key Lime Pie plants do well in terracotta pots.
  • Winter Hardy in Zones: 9a-10b.
  • Propagation: Adromischus cristasis is easily propagated with leaf cuttings.
  • Susceptibilities: This succulent is attractive to mealybugs and boll weevils.

Blue Chalksticks (Senecio serpens)

Senecio serpens
Krzysztof Golik / CC BY-SA

As its name suggests, Blue Chalksticks has attractive chalky, blue-green leaves that reach to the sky. When given the proper amount of sun, the edges of its cylindrical blue-green leaves will become purple, providing plenty of color in your garden. Typically used as groundcover, you can also grow Senecio serpens in a container garden. In summertime the blue-green and purple leaves are complemented by small, white flowers.

  • Lighting requirements: Full sun.
  • Watering requirements: Water only when the topsoil is completely dry, about once every three weeks. Reduce watering in winter months.
  • Soil requirements: The soil should be any well-draining, succulent or cactus mix.
  • Repotting: Repot in early spring if your plant outgrows its pot.
  • Winter Hardy in Zones: 10a-11b.
  • Propagation: Senecio serpens is easily propagated with leaf cuttings.
  • Susceptibilities: This succulent is susceptible to mealybugs and aphids and root rot if overwatered.

Copper Pinwheel (Aeonium ‘Sunburst’)

Aeonium ‘Sunburst’
Megan Hansen from Portland, OR, US / CC BY-SA

Similar in appearance to Echeveria ‘Compton Carousel,’ this charmer produces eye-catching variegated rosettes. Copper Pinwheel is green with either yellow or white stripes and can develop red tips when exposed to the proper amount of sunlight. This plant does flower in summertime, producing white blooms, but because it is monocarpic, it will die afterwards. Make sure to propagate it before this happens so you’ll have Copper Pinwheel plants for years to come!

  • Lighting requirements: Full to partial sun.
  • Watering requirements: Water only when the topsoil is completely dry. Reduce watering in winter months.
  • Soil requirements: The soil should be a sandy loam or regular potting mix since, unlike most succulents, your Copper Pinwheel will need more moisture in its soil.
  • Repotting: Repot every two to three years.
  • Winter Hardy in Zones: 9b-11b.
  • Propagation: Your Copper Pinwheel is easily propagated with stem cuttings.
  • Susceptibilities: This succulent is susceptible mealybugs and aphids.

‘Fred Ives’ (x Graptoveria ‘Fred Ives’)

Graptoveria ‘Fred Ives’
Leonora Enking from West Sussex, England / CC BY-SA

This fast-growing sunset-colored succulent produces huge rosettes reaching up to eight inches tall and twelve inches wide. Dazzling in colors like pink, purple, orange, and blue-green, you’ll definitely want to get ahold of a Fred Ives if you don’t have one already. In summer your plant will reward you with starry yellow blossoms upheld on elegant flower stalks.

  • Lighting requirements: Full sun, preferably outside. If grown outside, Fred Ives needs the brightest possible light.
  • Watering requirements: Water only when the topsoil is completely dry. Reduce watering in winter months.
  • Soil requirements: The soil should be any well-draining, porous succulent or cactus mix.
  • Repotting: Repot about every two years or whenever it gets too large for its container.
  • Winter Hardy in Zones: 8b-9b.
  • Propagation: Fred Ives is best propagated by leaf or stem cuttings and any offsets that appear.
  • Susceptibilities: This succulent is susceptible to mealybugs, aphids, and spider mites.

Coppertone Stonecrop (Sedum nussbaumerianum)

Sedum nussbaumerianum
The Titou / CC BY-SA

The colorful Coppertone Stonecrop produces fiery rosettes ranging in color from rosy-gold to copper-red when exposed to the full sun it loves. This versatile Mexican native grows about eight inches tall with two-inch wide rosettes and does well both indoors and out. It appeals to gardeners and butterfly-enthusiasts alike, as the plant attracts all sorts of Lepidoptera. In winter and spring, Sedum nussbaumerianum produces clusters of white, pink, or red dome-shaped flowers. It does well as groundcover or in a hanging basket.

  • Lighting requirements: Full sun.
  • Watering requirements: Water only when the topsoil is completely dry. Reduce watering in winter months.
  • Soil requirements: The soil should be any well-draining, porous succulent or cactus mix.
  • Repotting: Repot in early spring whenever it gets too large for its container.
  • Winter Hardy in Zones: 9a-11b.
  • Propagation: Coppertone Stonecrop is best propagated by leaf or stem cuttings.
  • Susceptibilities: This succulent is susceptible to aphids and flies.

Prickly Pear Cactus (Opuntia)

Opuntia compressa

The Prickly Pear Cactus can be recognized by its flat, wide, paddle-like pads, colorful oval shaped fruit, and yellow, red, or purple flowers it produces in late spring and early summer. This fetching blooming cactus is more than just looks, though. The Prickly Pear Cactus’ pads and fruit are also edible! Both the pads and the fruit can be eaten either raw or cooked.

  • Lighting requirements: Full sun.
  • Watering requirements: Water about twice a month in summer. Reduce watering to once a month in winter.
  • Soil requirements: The soil should be any well-draining, alkaline to neutral cactus mix.
  • Repotting: Repot in early spring whenever it gets too large for its container.
  • Winter Hardy in Zones: 9a-11b. Some varieties can tolerate colder climates.
  • Propagation: Prickly Pear Cactus is best propagated by pad cuttings.
  • Susceptibilities: Opuntia are not normally prone to pests but may be susceptible to mealybugs and root rot.

Retro Succulents Carmine Aloe (Aloe ‘Carmine’)

If you’re looking for interesting color and pattern in your succulent garden, you can’t go wrong with Carmine Aloe. This unique hybrid aloe produces striking rosettes with light green leaves flecked with orange and bordered with red-orange margins. It grows about eight inches tall and wide and can be planted alone or in small groups. It rarely blooms, but with such distinctive foliage, flowers won’t be missed. 

  • Lighting requirements: Full to partial sun.
  • Watering requirements: Water only when the topsoil is completely dry. Reduce watering in winter months.
  • Soil requirements: The soil should be any well-draining, succulent or cactus mix.
  • Repotting: Repot as needed, whenever it gets too large for its container or becomes rootbound.
  • Winter Hardy in Zones: 9a-11b.
  • Propagation: Aloes are best propagated by offsets.
  • Susceptibilities: This plant is susceptible to leaf spot.